Why new couriers shouldn’t overlook the need for insurance

For those who strive for independence in the workplace, courier work is often an attractive option. Couriers go motoring around the country’s streets and motorways, through the sun and rain, day and night. It can be a rewarding profession, both financially and personally, but as with many other self-employed positions, you should take heed of the associated costs, and added responsibilities of being your own boss.

Should you hire or buy your own van?

Buying can be a big financial investment but can work out cheaper in the long run than leasing, although leasing could be better for you on a low starting budget.

Insurance needs

And don’t forget to compare cheap courier insurance. If you are working on a self-employed basis, courier insurance should be considered to give you peace of mind – your costs will be covered in the event of a package going missing or being damaged. Courier insurance can cost up to four times as much as regular insurance, so make sure you shop around for the best deal.

It should be noted that you might not secure a regular income from the job straight away. While you strive to build up a base of regular customers and market your business effectively, you may have months where you struggle to break even. Also worth bearing in mind is the payment system for courier jobs. Customers typically have up to 30 days to deal with the invoices you send them, meaning your cash flow may be compromised in the first few weeks of business.